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Paris


The Treaty of Paris ended the Revolutionary War between Great Britain and the United States, recognized American independence and established borders for the new nation. After the British defeat at Yorktown, peace talks in Paris began in April 1782 between Richard Oswarld representing Great Britain and the American Peace Commissioners Benjamin Franklin, John Jay, and John Adams. The American negotiators were joined by Henry Laurens two days before the preliminary articles of peace were signed on November 30, 1782. The Treaty of Paris, formally ending the war, was not signed until September 3, 1783. The Continental Congress, which was temporarily situated in Annapolis, Maryland, at the time, ratified the Treaty of Paris on January 14, 1784.

An American Time Capsule: Three Centuries of Broadsides and Other Printed Ephemera

A broadside printed in Philadelphia on November 26, 1783, contains the full-text of the Treaty of Paris. Earlier that year, a broadside published in Baltimore outlined the principal articles of the preliminary peace treaty signed with Great Britain.

The Revolutionary Diplomatic Correspondence of the United States, a six-volume set, includes a wide variety of documents related to the peace negotiations with Great Britain during the American Revolution. For example, John Adams kept a journal of the peace negotiations that is included in this set. Adamss entry for November 30, 1782, discussed the signing of the preliminary articles of peace.

The Revolutionary Diplomatic Correspondence of the United States also provides biographical information on the American Peace Commissioners Franklin, Adams, and Jay.

Search the Journals of the Continental Congress and The Revolutionary Diplomatic Correspondence of the United States to locate additional information on the negotiations and ratification of the Treaty of Paris.

Includes a broadside of the preliminary articles of peace ending the Revolutionary War, which were ratified by Congress on April 15, 1783.

Also contains a broadside of a Congressional proclamation announcing the ratification of the Treaty of Paris on January 14, 1784.

Includes George Washingtons copy of the Preliminary Articles of Peace between the United States and Great Britain, which were signed in Paris on November 30, 1782.

Search Washingtons papers to find additional documents related to the American Revolution and the end of the war.

On November 12, 1782, Congress appointed Thomas Jefferson as an additional commissioner to join John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, John Jay and Henry Laurens in Europe to negotiate a peace treaty with Great Britain. Winter weather delayed Jeffersons departure, and Congress eventually withdrew the appointment on April 1, 1783. However, Jeffersons papers contain numerous documents related to the negotiations with Great Britain, including instructions on negotiating peace sent by Congress to the American Peace Commissioners dated August 1782 and October 29, 1783. Also contains instructions from Congress sent to the American Peace Commissioners dealing with fisheries, Indian affairs, and Canada that are dated August 1782.

Search Jeffersons papers to locate additional documents related to this topic.